See the finalists and the winner!

Thank you to all our contest participants.

The theme for the Gardeners’ Market photo contest is “The Beauty of Sharing”.


The Winner is …

The winner is Dragonfly and Hens and Chicks by Nancy B. It narrowly won over A Bee’s Story of Bees by Petra L.

Dragonfly and Hens and Chicks: My interest in gardening honed my interest in taking photos and this one of the dragon fly sitting in amongst my ‘Hens & Chicks’ has got to be my favourite. This particular garden in our backyard faced southwest, so it was well protected and curled up behind our garage on one side and deck on another. I believe I started with a couple of small 4″ pots of the Hens & Chicks and it grew on top of a mound of buried rocks into a 6′ round mass of greens and burgundies. And, once mature, they produced dozens of flowers reaching about 10″ tall which the bees and dragonflies loved. For some reason, I have always believed that if a dragonfly ‘landed on you’ it would bring good luck and I took that to mean ‘with gardening’. Thanks for letting me share this photo and story.

Photographer: Nancy B.


A Bee story of B’s: Bees have always fascinated me on how they go from flower to flower and never tire out. Over the years, I have adapted my garden so my little friends could choose which flowers to pollinate, what nectar tastes good and where to spread their wings as they travel to other nearby gardens. Here are some fun facts:• There are 4,000 different sizes of species of bees in North America.• They have different tongue lengths and will feed on different shaped and colored flowers.• The flowers they prefer are blue, purple, violet, white, yellow and native plants. When I see bees flying in my garden, sometimes I am lucky enough to take a photograph up close as they buzz around so quickly from flower to flower. When I capture the moment, it allows me to share their beauty to those who also love bees as much as I do.

Photographer: Petra L.


Dahlias: Dahlias have always been a favourite flower of mine because of their unique and individual shapes and colours and I think they are one of the showiest blooms we prairie gardeners can have. I likely developed my love for them as a young girl because my Mom always grew them in our 1 acre garden in Silver Springs, long before it was part of the city, and from a young age of 6 we all helped in the garden, and had our own individual little garden areas.

Photographer: Joan C.


Peony Poppy: I first found this poppy growing in a BC historical town. I was doing a self guided walking tour in this mining town. As I walked past a man in his garden, I was taken with the profusion of these beautiful poppies. I had never seen a peony poppy before. Of course I just had to stop and ask about them and whether he would share some seed heads with me. He was very obliging and I came home and planted them in my garden. Since then I have shared these seeds with many people, friends as well as at my church garage sale.

Photographer: Elaine H.


Clover For Every Bee Buddy: Our home is their home! The Photo represents so much more then a field of Aliske Clover and Red Clover. Its the story of how our family learned to let go of our need for controlling nature, and learned to let go of the notion we are only upstanding folks if we have a well maintained grass lawn. It started by accident as many things do. One Spring there was the usual flip flop of weather and a big gust of wind blew many of the blooms off our flowering shrubs especially the early bloomers like our Nanking Cherries and Muckle plums, then came the flood!! When the the down pour finally stopped, and things dried enough to be in the garden, my husband could not wait to mow our crazy lawn that was now overgrown and not presentable to the social norms you see. As I walked along the front of our acreage I noticed many bees struggling and walking slowly along the patio and crawling lethargically in our front yard. They were dying! They were in desperate need of a food source! That’s when I saw a flurry of movement ahead, it was what seemed like hundreds of bees feasting away at our clover buffet. The clover which had been planted as a cover crop when our acreage was a farmers field had survived the cool, windy weather.As I heard my husbands lawn tractor approaching, I yelled “stop”! “You cant mow this area, we have to save the bees, they are starving”! To my surprise although he loves his lawn, he said ” I guess we can share our yard with the bees”. Now every year my husband Paul, leaves a special place for the bees and butterflies to enjoy. Alsike Clover (Trifolium Hybridum) – Alsike clover is not native to Alberta however it is naturalized. Alsike is a short-lived perennial plant, it can be revitalized by broadcasting its seeds to promote next seasons crop. Similar in many ways to red clover, it matures a week to ten days earlier. It is especially well adapted to cool climates and wet soils, will tolerate flooding for considerable periods. Alsike clover seeds will also germinate and produce well on well-drained soils, such as our heavy clay soil. It Does well on soils to acidic for red clover, and will tolerate more alkalinity than most clovers; however, it responds to lime application. May be readily established on poorly drained or overflow land. Usually produces only one hay crop a year. Fits well in pasture mixes for wet lands. Alsike clover tends to lodge badly; a companion crop is desirable for hay production. Flowers are pink or white.

Photographer: Michelle Dominique A.


Photo and Story about the Beauty of Sharing

Contest participants submitted a garden photo and story about the Beauty of Sharing. View the entries by scrolling to the gallery lower on this page. Be sure to read the stories in the captions and learn how the photo captures a story of “the beauty of sharing”. To see an image full-size, click on the image to open the gallery. Use the arrows to scroll through the gallery. If the gallery closes unexpectedly, reopen it again to view the rest of the photos. The photo name is the title of the image in the gallery. The name is also at the beginning of the photo’s caption.

The winner will receive a fabulous prize package.

If you can’t attend the Gardeners’ Market, the finalists and winner will be featured on this page after the event.

Beautiful Blue Oyster Mushrooms

Beautiful Blue Oyster Mushrooms: My first attempt at growing mushrooms. Many thanks to a recent online class from CalHort and Fungi Akuafo!

A Rose By Any Other Name

A Rose By Any Other Name: My family and I travelled to Victoria to spend Easter at the end of this March with my brother, who serves in the Navy. My mother and I took the opportunity to go tour the Butchart Gardens to enjoy a 'sneak-peak' at spring flowers and what we may expect in Calgary in a few months time (fingers crossed). While touring the gardens, I spotted this beautiful Hellebore and took a photo. I pointed it out to my mom, while passing strangers exclaimed that they wished they knew "what plant it was"? I gave a smile and explained that it was a Hellebore, but that I knew it more commonly as a 'Lenten Rose.' Smiling, they exclaimed, "Who knew roses could bloom so early?" We shared a smile and laugh together, and started talking about where we were all from and our favourite spring plants. The power of sharing nature with others can build friendships and community in a single moment and for our lifetimes.

A Bee story of B's

A Bee story of B's: Bees have always fascinated me on how they go from flower to flower and never tire out. Over the years, I have adapted my garden so my little friends could choose which flowers to pollinate, what nectar tastes good and where to spread their wings as they travel to other nearby gardens. Here are some fun facts:• There are 4,000 different sizes of species of bees in North America.• They have different tongue lengths and will feed on different shaped and colored flowers.• The flowers they prefer are blue, purple, violet, white, yellow and native plants.When I see bees flying in my garden, sometimes I am lucky enough to take a photograph up close as they buzz around so quickly from flower to flower. When I capture the moment, it allows me to share their beauty to those who also love bees as much as I do.

Bee Generous

Bee Generous: Bees have always fascinated me on how they go from flower to flower and never tire out. Over the years, I have adapted my garden so my little friends could choose which flowers to pollinate, what nectar tastes good and where to spread their wings as they travel to other nearby gardens. Here are some fun facts:• Bees favor sunny spots over shade and need some shelter from strong winds and a bit of water to quench their thirst.• Bees are basically looking for two things when they visit plants:Nectar: which is loaded with sugars which gives them a main source of energyPollen: which provides them with a balanced diet of proteins and fats.When I see bees flying in my garden, sometimes I am lucky enough to take a photograph up close as they buzz around so quickly from flower to flower. When I capture the moment, it allows me to share their beauty to those who also love bees as much as I do.

Bee Hind

Bee Hind: Bees have always fascinated me on how they go from flower to flower and never tire out. Over the years, I have adapted my garden so my little friends could choose which flowers to pollinate, what nectar tastes good and where to spread their wings as they travel to other nearby gardens. Here are some fun facts:• One single bee colony could pollinate close to 300 million flowers each day and that’s about 80% of all flowering plants on our Earth.• They provide nourishing habitats for animals like birds and other insects.• Bees are vital to our human food supply; they pollinate 70 of the top 100 human food crops.When I see bees flying in my garden, sometimes I am lucky enough to take a photograph up close as they buzz around so quickly from flower to flower. When I capture the moment, it allows me to share their beauty to those who also love bees as much as I do.

Pink Peony Bushes

Pink Peony Bushes: Two of my friends had pink peony bushes up against the south facing walls of their homes. They would get up at least 25 blossoms or more from one bush. Before one friend moved she gave me a bit of her bush. I don't get that many blooms, but enough to think of them both when mine bloom.

Birds of Spring

Birds of Spring: When I look at this vignette near my front door, I think of shared times with family and friends. Dollar store shopping with my sister yielded birds to ”do something with” in my garden. My brother hauled up and cut forest logs for me and my husband Tom rolled them in place. My husband and brother shared their time in drilling holes into the spindles so I could have sturdy posts and my brother even developed and built a tool for me to make the spindle pounding easier. (I have a lot of these spindles throughout the garden!) A friend in my garden group gave me my first lamium to use as a filler and I happily place it into contained beds. Drink holders in the lawn seen and used at a friends gathering inspired me to get some and use them architecturally in the garden. And of course my mom and dad inspired a love of gardening and my mom, at 94, still comes and spends part of the summer with me and helps to weed the vignettes and sweep around them. So when I view this vignette and almost everything in my garden, the nostalgia component is huge. Plants shared, parties shared, chores shared, designs shared…it is an ongoing experience of being loved as I stroll through and work in my garden.

Bloodroot

Bloodroot: Many years ago while visiting a friend's garden I was struck by the beautiful leaves of a mass planting in a corner. He offered to share some with me at the end of the season. The following year I was amazed to see these delicate white flower sprouting up early in the spring. They only remain for a short time, falling off as the leaves unfurl. I eagerly await their arrival and they are one of my favourite plants.

Blue Oyster Bucket Mushrooms

Blue Oyster Bucket Mushrooms: I took a course on growing mushrooms, thanks to CalHort and Fungi Akuafo. Through all the steps of preparing the substrate, Inoculation, incubating and final fruiting it has been an education.

Blue Bachelor Button

Blue Bachelor Button: It has become an annual tradition in my family to start flowers from seed. This time I planted Bachelor Buttons for the first time and was surprised by the many colours they came in. I dried some and made floral collages to mail to friends.

Calling all Blossoms

Calling all Blossoms: I have had this apple tree for over 25 years and it always amazes me how it can brighten all the seasons. Over the years it has been grafted onto other friends' trees to offer them a chance to enjoy her beauty in the spring and her fruit in the fall. All creatures have benefitted from her existence, from the tiniest ant, numerous pollinators, various birds and us humans. This tree is a marvelous sharer.

Clover For Every Bee Buddy

Clover For Every Bee Buddy: Our home is their home! The Photo represents so much more then a field of Aliske Clover and Red Clover. Its the story of how our family learned to let go of our need for controlling nature, and learned to let go of the notion we are only upstanding folks if we have a well maintained grass lawn. It started by accident as many things do. One Spring there was the usual flip flop of weather and a big gust of wind blew many of the blooms off our flowering shrubs especially the early bloomers like our Nanking Cherries and Muckle plums, then came the flood!! When the the down pour finally stopped, and things dried enough to be in the garden, my husband could not wait to mow our crazy lawn that was now overgrown and not presentable to the social norms you see. As I walked along the front of our acreage I noticed many bees struggling and walking slowly along the patio and crawling lethargically in our front yard. They were dying! They were in desperate need of a food source! That's when I saw a flurry of movement ahead, it was what seemed like hundreds of bees feasting away at our clover buffet. The clover which had been planted as a cover crop when our acreage was a farmers field had survived the cool, windy weather.As I heard my husbands lawn tractor approaching, I yelled "stop"! "You cant mow this area, we have to save the bees, they are starving"! To my surprise although he loves his lawn, he said " I guess we can share our yard with the bees". Now every year my husband Paul, leaves a special place for the bees and butterflies to enjoy. Alsike Clover (Trifolium Hybridum) - Alsike clover is not native to Alberta however it is naturalized. Alsike is a short-lived perennial plant, it can be revitalized by broadcasting its seeds to promote next seasons crop. Similar in many ways to red clover, it matures a week to ten days earlier. It is especially well adapted to cool climates and wet soils, will tolerate flooding for considerable periods. Alsike clover seeds will also germinate and produce well on well-drained soils, such as our heavy clay soil. It Does well on soils to acidic for red clover, and will tolerate more alkalinity than most clovers; however, it responds to lime application. May be readily established on poorly drained or overflow land. Usually produces only one hay crop a year. Fits well in pasture mixes for wet lands. Alsike clover tends to lodge badly; a companion crop is desirable for hay production. Flowers are pink or white.

Dahlias

Dahlias: Dahlias have always been a favourite flower of mine because of their unique and individual shapes and colours and I think they are one of the showiest blooms we prairie gardeners can have. I likely developed my love for them as a young girl because my Mom always grew them in our 1 acre garden in Silver Springs, long before it was part of the city, and from a young age of 6 we all helped in the garden, and had our own individual little garden areas.

Feed Me! Feed Me!

Feed Me! Feed Me!: Sparrows have moved into the mountain ash tree in our front yard. Every year they build nests and (hopefully) raise their babies. This particular year, they had their babies and we watched the parents bring them food and as they started to explore the yard. They started at the base of the tree they were born in, then, as they got braver, they made their way to the backyard exploring this huge unknown world. We watched as they stuck together along the fence, then started venturing further and further into parts of the yard on their own. We really enjoyed sharing our yard with these babies and watching them grow.

Garden Bouquet

Garden Bouquet: My mother has been gardening for as long as I can remember. On a sunny afternoon, she was picking flowers from her garden to gift a beautiful bouquet for a friend. I couldn’t let the moment pass, which is representative of the countless flowers my mother has given to others, and I snapped a photo. She has shared not only fresh garden flowers with others to lift their spirits, but also her love of gardening with me – as I have only in recent years learned to plant my own seeds and understand the joy a sprout can bring!

Gardener Reimagined

Gardener Reimagined: The garden is less about me sharing my time, effort, and energy with it as it is about the garden paying me back a hundred fold in enjoyment, memories, and opportunity to share with others. This gardener makes me smile every time I walk past him always working, always happy he is a reminder of antiquing and Millarville market adventures with friends and family. At his feet are discarded work boots and shoes from my dad, husband, and brother which are often filled with flowers or covered in moss, depending on the year. The antique basin is filled with irises from my garden buddies and they manage to survive and bloom every year despite being left in the pot over the winter. Gardeners are survivors and we lament with our gardening buddies as they suffer garden losses and celebrate with them as they experience success. My perpetual gardening rooster reminds me that we are a breed that keeps going, no matter the weather, the hard work or losses. We look forward to spring, the planting, the weeding, the time in the garden sharing our time with nature, others, and our creator God.

Glenda's Peony

Glenda's Peony: Avid gardeners often acquire unusual or less common plants and Glenda was one of those people. She was more than willing to share many of her plants with other gardeners. This peony comes from her garden. I believe it is a Saunders, 1951, Paeonia tenuifolia x woodwardii hybrid peony called 'Earlybird'. It is the first peony to bloom in my yard. Its finely dissected foliage remains upright and is an architectural delight for the rest of the season. Although Glenda no longer has a garden, this is my reminder of her garden, and in my garden, I call this Glenda's Peony.

Haven

Haven: This archway formed by my lilac hedge draws me in every time I walk through it. Before my dad died, he inserted the wrought iron into my gate and it always reminds me of him daily as I enter the garden. My mom at 94 still helps weed and groom the garden…I can still see her sweeping the concrete for me….Gardening buddies gifted me with lamium and it loves the planter it is placed into. Many parties and conversations have occurred at the fire pit and planter my husband built…part of the 120 tonnes of rundle rock my husband placed in the garden early on in our marriage. We planted the lilac hedge together, we supervised the pouring of the concrete, he indulged all my painting experiments and joked that he had to move quickly or be painted himself. Now that Tom is 70, a reel of experiences and events come flooding in as I peruse the mature garden. We are also now mature and so have a lifetime of shared work, events, hobbies, fun, family gatherings, rest, harvest and growth, meditation, and forest bathing that all happen in the garden and because of the garden. We are blessed.

History in the Garden

History in the Garden: The story behind this photograph...I incorporate some hints of my farm background throughout my garden. Besides being passionate about gardening, I am also a crafter. I participate in some small local Craft Markets within the city. This photograph is part of the repertoire of photo art, knitting and wearable art creations on my craft table display. When a customer saw this particular photo, she thanked me for sharing this inspiration. She also had an old milk can and didn't know how to incorporate it in her garden until seeing this photograph. It warmed my heart that I inspired someone with my art!

Hosta Flower

Hosta Flower: Last summer we had new next door neighbours, who purchased several plants with very limited understanding of the amount of sunlight in their yard. I suggested they exchange the three hostas for plants that would better tolerate the full sun. Instead they gave the hostas to us. They found a happy home on the north side of our garage and produced this gorgeous flower.

Jack Frost Brunnera

Jack Frost Brunnera: Blue forget-me-not flowers are for sharing memories.

Just Bee Natural

Just Bee Natural: My favourite creature to share my garden with is the bees. I always make sure I have flowers for them to enjoy and I get to enjoy their company in return!

Just Hangin' Out

Just Hangin' Out: Every year there are surprise visitors in our yard. Some days it is a bunny coming to visit, other days a flock of waxwings, sometimes a group of butterflies. One day it was this daddy longlegs hanging out on my black eyed Susan vine. He seemed so comfortable there. One of the things I love about gardening is seeing who comes to visit to share it with us.

Lillium Asphodel swapped for a piece of Cranberry Ice

Lillium Asphodel swapped for a piece of Cranberry Ice: The lady that volunteered her lily into my garden even planted it for me. I delight in its early Daylily brilliance. She's tough and fecund - I have flunked daffodils. - So Asphodel is a great Consolation prize.

Maple Beauty

Maple Beauty: Every year in fall this little maple puts on this spectacular show of colour in our front garden and people stop to look and admire its beauty. We get many compliments from people passing by as well as our neighbours. It is a nice thing to share with everyone

Would you like some?

Would you like some?: My granddaughter loves harvesting from our garden and greenhouse. She always runs over from where ever she's been picking and calls out "Looks what I got! Would you like some?

Peony Poppy

Peony Poppy: I first found this poppy growing in a BC historical town. I was doing a self guided walking tour in this mining town. As I walked past a man in his garden, I was taken with the profusion of these beautiful poppies. I had never seen a peony poppy before. Of course I just had to stop and ask about them and whether he would share some seed heads with me. He was very obliging and I came home and planted them in my garden. Since then I have shared these seeds with many people, friends as well as at my church garage sale.

Pink Morning Glory

Pink Morning Glory: I started taking gardening seriously during the pandemic. Morning glories were the first kind of flower I started from seed. It was so exciting to watch the development of the seedling, to the first bloom. It was also fun to garden with my family to share the experience over the summer and enjoy the fruits of our labour at the end of the season. Now it is an annual tradition.

Pinning Baby Blue Oyster Mushrooms

Pinning Baby Blue Oyster Mushrooms: I attended a zoom class through CalHort in early March, on how to grow mushrooms. Looks like a success so far. Needs more time to grow fully now.

Sitting Pretty

Sitting Pretty: We share our yard with some flickers. Or are they sharing their yard with us? They come looking for a mate in the spring and food in the summer. In their quest for a delicious meal, they aerate our grass for us, pecking into the ground looking for insects. The grass may not need it right then, but it is still fun to watch them – aerating our lawn, having a bath or a drink in our waterfall, or just spending time in our trees looking beautiful.

Spring Crocus at the Dog Park

Spring Crocus at the Dog Park: Spring in the dog part at Tom Campbell the crocus emerge.

Spring Gold

Spring Gold: This beautiful iris never fails to exhibit star power.

Spring Garden

Spring Garden: A friend's Garden celebrating spring.

Stargazer Lily

Stargazer Lily: Each year Denyce invites the members of our senior's camera club to a PFT (Photo Field Trip) to photograph her garden when it is at its peak. Last year she was eager to show me this gorgeous stargazer lily, and I greatly appreciated her sharing it to me and inviting me to photograph it.

Stories from the Garden

Stories from the Garden: My garden tells the stories of inspiration and gardens before it. So many gifted plants that were special to someone else. They come up each year with the memories of those gardeners, some no longer with us except in spirit. These are perennial foxgloves with such a stories behind them.

Sun Kissed Lily

Sun Kissed Lily: The past year has been challenging and when sharing my story with a friend, I was invited to spend a few hours in her garden as we chatted and photographed some lovely flowers. The sun shone on this beautiful lily and it warmed my heart.

Sunflower and Bee

Sunflower and Bee: It has become a summertime tradition since COVID to start a garden with my family. We decided to try sunflowers, and they grew so tall that our neighbour could see them over our fence! They brought her joy, as well as the bees for their abundance of pollen; along with the squirrels who beheaded the sunflowers in late fall to eat the seeds.

Sunflower Friends

Sunflower Friends: These rusty brown sunflowers self seeded in a bed near our road. I have never seen a petal from one flower, wrap around the stem of its friend. How fun to have a sunflower friend to help hold you up in the breeze!

Tartarian Maple Charm

Tartarian Maple Charm: I enjoy exploring all the wonders of Calgary especially by foot or bicycle and often find something new on my adventures. Last July, while on one of my bike rides, I came across this beauty that caused me to stop and take a second look. It looked like a tree adorned, ready for Christmas, in the middle of summer. As I had never seen such a tree I was curious to find out what it was. Stopping to observe often helps in our education of possible things to grow in our challenging climate. Diversity makes for unique gardens.

Texas Bluebonnets

Texas Bluebonnets: I went to Texas recently for the eclipse and bluebonnets were in full bloom everywhere. They are such a pretty flower.

The Fruit Grove

The Fruit Grove: The Fruit Grove – designed and cultivated by Carol Patterson: Time for a break from the hurly burly of city living. Come to The Fruit Grove in the Botanical Gardens of Silver Springs {BGSS}, where gardeners use the beauty of plants that also create food, to provide an oasis in the city. In the fall you will find many tree-ripened fruits which are almost all edible. Now you can also borrow a gardening book from the BGSS Little Botanical Library and learn how to create your own little oasis

The Shakespeare Garden

The Shakespeare Garden: Shakespeare Garden – designed and cultivated by Laurel Caddel The Shakespeare Garden is a tribute to the works of Shakespeare, growing plants that are mentioned in his works. "There's rosemary for you, that's for remembrance. Pray you, love, remember." ~ Ophelia, Act IV of Hamlet. As you wander the garden and sit on the benches, take time to find inspiration in the connection between literature and gardens

Welcome to Spring!

Welcome to Spring!: I discovered this Adonis in my MIL's yard more than 20 years ago. I moved a few seedlings into my garden and the rest is history. They have self-seeded over the years in my garden and I have shared many of these plants with gardening friends ever since. I've had flowers as early as April 18 and always by early May, extending into June. The cheerful yellow blooms of this plant rewards us with more than six weeks of color in the early spring.

Wild violets in my lawn

Wild violets in my lawn: My parents had wild violets growing on their property in B.C. The scent in the spring was marvelous! I decided to transplant some to my yard, even though my father considered them weeds. "They might be weeds here, but in Calgary they will be loved flowers!" I put a few at the back of my house and a few in front. They have slowly spread. Every spring when I go outside I can smell their wonderful scent in the yard and it reminds me of my parents.

Winter shares its beauty with Spring

Winter shares its beauty with Spring: My first year with my Double Flowering Plum. I always admired their beauty and received one as a gift from a friend the previous year. Wow! What a beautiful display next spring but winter was not done sharing its cold and snow and my plum was covered in ice one morning. The ice crystals on the petals were stunning and I had to take a photo.

Dragonfly and Hens & Chicks

My interest in gardening honed my interest in taking photos and this one of the dragon fly sitting in amongst my 'Hens & Chicks' has got to be my favourite. This particular garden in our backyard faced southwest, so it was well protected and curled up behind our garage on one side and deck on another. I believe I started with a couple of small 4" pots of the Hens & Chicks and it grew on top of a mound of buried rocks into a 6' round mass of greens and burgundies. And, once mature, they produced dozens of flowers reaching about 10" tall which the bees and dragonflies loved. For some reason, I have always believed that if a dragonfly 'landed on you' it would bring good luck and I took that to mean 'with gardening'. Thanks for letting me share this photo and story.

Thank you for helping us select the finalists.

Thank you to everyone who entered the contest: Bernie Laatsch, Carol Moore, Caroline Harris, Catherine Gerrits, Diana King, Elaine Haggith, Elizabeth Finkbiner, Elyse Tremblay, Genevieve Myrthu, Heather Knorr, Jean Kensit, Jeanne Gonnason, Jen Peddlesden, Joan Cross, Lee Symborski, Linda MacKay, Linda Wilson, Margaret Jarratt, Marian Mulligan, Marjerie Salisse, Michelle Dominique Aris, Petra Lange, Rosanne Fortini-Burrows and Verne Williams.

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